Anti-Inflammatory Diet (2020-2022)

There is strong evidence that chronic inflammation is a major driver of many chronic diseases including diabetes, heart disease, digestive disorders and certain cancers. Taking advantage of all the current data on nutrition and its impact on inflammation, the anti-inflammatory diet is based upon dietary patterns found in traditional Mediterranean and Asian eating habits. The diet is designed to replace inflammation-triggering foods with nutrient-rich micro and macronutrients that fight inflammation.

This freshly updated course provides clinicians with an in-depth understanding of how to counsel patients on dietary strategies that can reduce inflammation, decrease the risk for many chronic diseases, and improve mood and energy levels.

Course objectives:

  • Describe the role of inflammation in overall health and specific medical conditions.
  • Explain the relationship between dietary intake and systemic inflammation.
  • Identify specific dietary components that can increase inflammation in the body.
  • Summarize the evidence for eating patterns that are associated with lower levels of systemic inflammation.

Completion Requirements

Complete all the course work, course evaluation, and the final test with a score of 70% or better. Upon successful completion you will be able to print your certificate of completion.

Curriculum

Introduction - Learn the components of the anti-inflammatory diet, and how food and nutrition can help in the amelioration of certain conditions.
Understanding Inflammation - An explanation of how long-term inflammation can contribute to, and even cause, numerous unhealthy conditions.
Inflammation: Clinical Correlation - An overview of a variety of conditions influenced by inflammation and diet.
AI Diet as an Eating Pattern - Get a detailed description of the food groups that comprise an anti-inflammatory diet, a sample meal plan, and a Patient Waiting Room to apply these concepts.
Exam
Evaluation

Target Audience

Physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurses, and dietitians.

Enrollment

You can register and start immediately. If you register for the course and pay with a credit card you will have immediate access to the course. Once your registration is complete, logout and log back in and your course will be listed on the campus page. If you cannot remember your account information, click the Forgot Password link on the login page and it will be emailed to you.

Anti-Inflammatory Diet
Disclosure & Credit Information

COM CME

ACCME/AMA PRA Accreditation and CME Designation Statement

The University of Arizona College of Medicine — Tucson is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The University of Arizona College of Medicine — Tucson designates this enduring material for a maximum of 5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

This course includes an assessment of 15 questions that you must answer 70% correctly or above in order to receive credit for participation. You are allowed unlimited re-attempts.

Current CME Approval Period: 8/24/2020 to 08/23/2022

Most Recent Review by Author: 08/24/2020

Conflict of Interest Disclosure Information

Dr. Alschuler has disclosed that she is a speaker for Gaia Herbs and NutraCorp, and that she has received research support for Pharmavite. In her role as a planner for this activity, she recused herself from choosing faculty who would deliver presentations that discuss products made by these commercial interests. As a faculty member, her presentation was reviewed, and the content was found unrelated to specific business lines or products of these companies.

All other faculty, CME Planning Committee Members, and the CME Office Reviewers have disclosed that they have no financial relationships with commercial interests that would constitute a conflict of interest concerning this CME activity.

Commercial Support

There is no commercial support for this activity.

Faculty / Authors

Lise Alschuler, ND; Assistant Director, Fellowship Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine; Professor, Department of Medicine University of Arizona College of Medicine-Tucson

Laura Micek-Galinat, MD MD; Associate Professor, Department of Family & Community Medicine University of Arizona

Ann Marie Chiasson, MD, MPH; Director of the Fellowship, Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine; Associate Professor, Department of Medicine University of Arizona College of Medicine-Tucson

Tamara Steinitz ; Director Didactic Program in Dietetics, Utah State University; Assistant Clinical Professor, University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine

Priscilla Abercrombie, RN, NP, PhD, AHN-BC, PhD; Clinical Professor UCSF Departments of Family Health Care Nursing and Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences

Planning Committee

Ann Marie Chiasson, MD, MPH, CCFP; Director, Fellowship in Integrative Medicine, University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine.

Lise Alschuler, ND; Assistant Director, Fellowship Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine; Professor, Department of Medicine University of Arizona College of Medicine-Tucson

Priscilla Abercrombie, RN, NP, PhD, AHN-BC, PhD; Clinical Professor UCSF Departments of Family Health Care Nursing and Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences

Copyright

All rights reserved - Arizona Board of Regents.