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Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine

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Prostate Cancer: An Integrative Approach

$210 Physicians
$140 Healthcare Providers
$140 Public
$ 70 Students

7 CME/CE

PHYSICIANS

The American Cancer Society notes that prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality in the United States, second only to lung cancer, and is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men. In 2013, it accounted for more than 29,000 deaths. The Integrative Approach to Prostate Cancer advances the most effective integrative strategies for the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer, as well as for reducing the risk of recurrence. In addition to the best of conventional care, Integrative medicine considers the “whole person” when crafting an optimal treatment regimen that includes a focus on nutrition, lifestyle, physical fitness, stress management and dietary supplements. 

Recent studies have shown that between 27 and 43 percent of American men with prostate cancer have used at least one form of complementary or integrative therapy. The problem is that patients don't often mention their use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to their physicians, which is compounded by reluctance of clinicians to speak to their patients about CAM therapies. This course is designed to bridge that gap.

Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  1. Identify the risk factors for prostate cancer and support patients in reducing their modifiable risks.
  2. Review the controversies and policy guidelines regarding prostate cancer screening to effectively counsel men about their options.
  3. Describe the methods for diagnosing and staging prostate cancer.
  4. Recognize the widespread use of complementary and alternative therapies by prostate cancer patients and incorporate respectful dialogue about their use into patient consultations.
  5. Review the potential benefits and risks of alternative therapies in the prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer to help patients make better healthcare choices.
  6. Assess the evidence for benefit and risk for different prostate cancer treatment options to help patients make informed choices and improve outcomes.
  7. Cite the evidence for safety and benefit for dietary supplements in the prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer.
  8. Discuss the prevalence of cancer treatment-related side effects and their effect on overall patient quality of life.
  9. Discuss prevention strategies, including lifestyle modifications that can reduce the risk of long-term adverse effects from androgen deprivation therapy.
  10. Assess the evidence for different treatment strategies for the treatment of erectile dysfunction, urinary incontinence, hot flashes and treatment-related bone loss to help patients make informed choices and improve outcomes.
  11. Participants will be able to describe the importance of taking a proactive approach in incorporating management of side effects into the clinical encounter.
  12. Participants will be able to describe the effect of clinician discussions of end-of-life care on quality of life.

Completion Requirements

Complete all the course work, course evaluation, and the final test with a score of 70% or better. Upon successful completion you will be able to print your certificate of completion.

Curriculum

Section I: Introduction

Section II: Prevention and Screening
Risk Factors and Screening - risk factors for the development of prostate cancer and relative merits of current prostate cancer screening techniques.
Prevention - specific, modifiable lifestyle choices that can impact a man's risk of developing prostate cancer.

Section III: Treatment
Treatment - integrative approaches during treatment.

Section IV: Survivorship
Survivorship - integrative approaches for post-treatment living.
End-of-Life Care - particular needs for end-of-life care.

Target Audience

Nurse practitioners, nurses, physicians, and physician assistants in any specialty. In addition, all health practitioners who have an interest in an integrative approach to healing are targeted.

Enrollment

You will have a maximum of 90 days access to the material from the start date. If you register for the course and pay with a credit card you will have immediate access to the course. Once your registration is complete, logout and log back in and your course will be listed on the campus page. If you cannot remember your account information, click the Forgot Password link on the login page and it will be emailed to you.

Prostate Cancer Disclosure & Education Credit Info

Disclosures

Faculty & Authors

The following faculty have disclosed that they have no financial interest, arrangement, or affiliation that would constitute a conflict of interest concerning this CME/CE activity. They have stated that their presentations do not include discussion of commercial products or devices or unlabeled/investigational drug use.

Mark D. Gilbert, MD, Dip. ABPN, FRCP(c), Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry; Director of Mind-Body Skills Group Program at Arizona Health Sciences Center
Steven Gurgevich, PhD, Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine
Randy Horwitz, MD, PhD, Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine; Medical Director, Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine
Tieraona Low Dog, MD, Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine; Director of the Fellowship, Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine
Donald I. Abrams, MD, Director of Clinical Programs, Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, University of California, San Francisco; Chief of Hematology and Oncology at San Francisco General Hospital
Anand Dhruva, MD, Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco
Iman Hakim, MD, PhD, MPH, Director and Professor, Health Promotion Sciences; Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, The University of Arizona
Aaron E. Katz, MD, Director of the Center for Holistic Urology, Columbia University Medical Center
Evan Kligman, MD, MDiv, Associate Medical Director, Casa de la Luz Hospice; Founder and Medical Director, Clinica Amistad
Weidong Lu, MB, MPH, Instructor in Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center; Acupuncture Therapist, Dana Farber Cancer Institute
Gerard E. Mullin, MD, MHS, CSNP, FACP, Director of Integrative Nutrition Services, Johns Hopkins Hospital; Associate Editor, Integrative Medicine: a Clinician's Journal
David S. Rosenthal, MD, Professor, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Henry K. Oliver Professor of Hygiene, Department of Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University; Active Medical Staff, Zakim Center for Integrated Therapies, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute; Director, Harvard University Health Services
Cynthia A. Thomson, PhD, RD, CONS, Associate Professor, Nutrition Science, Medicine, and Public Health, The University of Arizona
Rena B. Zimmerman, MD, Radiation Oncologist, Cancer Treatment Centers of America
Santosh Rao, MD, Case University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center
Nurse Planner: Mary Koithan, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, Nursing, The University of Arizona

Planning Committee

The planning committee members state that they have no financial relationships with commercial interests whose products or services are discussed in this activity.

Tieraona Low Dog, MD, Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine; Director of the Fellowship, Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine
Donald I. Abrams, MD, Director of Clinical Programs, Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, University of California, San Francisco; Chief of Hematology and Oncology at San Francisco General Hospital
Randy Horwitz, PhD, MD, Medical Director, Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine
Molly Burke, MFA, BA, CMT, Project Manager, Fellowship in Integrative Medicine, Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine

CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION REVIEWER DISCLOSURE

The following University of Arizona College of Medicine CME Office Reviewer has no relationships with commercial interests that would constitute a conflict of interest with the proposed activity.

John M. Harris Jr., MD, MBA
Executive Director

Office of Continuing Medical Education

University of Arizona College of Medicine
Office of Continuing Medical Education
520-626-7832
uofacme@email.arizona.edu

Credit Detail

The University of Arizona College of Medicine at the Arizona Health Sciences Center is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

PHYSICIANS

The University of Arizona College of Medicine at the Arizona Health Sciences Center designates this Enduring Material for a maximum of 7.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Original Release date: September 1, 2009
Date of Most Recent Review: August 1, 2013
Current Approval Period September 1, 2013 to August 31, 2015

Approved for 7 contact hours approval code is DIEPRO1113–14.

Course delivery

All courses are online, web-based format. Teaching strategies include interactive case scenarios, case studies, and quizzes. There may be some video included. This course is estimated to take 7 hours to complete.

Disclaimer

This course does not constitute medical advice. Healthcare providers should exercise their own independent medical judgment.
All case studies and patient scenarios in this course are used for illustrative purposes. All depictions of persons (other than faculty) are models not actual patients.

Privacy and Confidentiality Statement

AzCIM will not release names, email addresses, or personal identifying information to third parties.

Copyright

All rights reserved - Arizona Board of Regents.